Episode 21: Exploring the Intersection of Engineering and SEO with Abishek Surana Rajendra, Senior Director of Organic Growth, Course Hero

This is The Marketing Hero podcast by ClearPivot, turning marketers into heroes.

Maia Wells:

Welcome to The Marketing Hero podcast. I'm your host Maia Wells. In this world of SaaS marketing, it's easier than you'd ever imagine for engineering and marketing to drift further and further apart. The daily functions of product and marketing departments are usually pretty separated, but it is so important for us to try and understand how these two parts work together to build a thriving business.

Our guest today is Abishek Surana Rajendra. He is the Senior Director of Organic Growth at Course Hero. We're going to talk today about Abishek's engineering background and how that has informed his current focus on SEO, because there's such an interesting aspect here that many marketers and less technical people, like me, hello, may overlook. And that's the behind-the-scenes role of product and technical SEO in attracting the right organic traffic.

Abishek Surana Rajendra, welcome to the show.

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Thank you so much for having me, Maia. Thank you for that introduction. It's an honor to be here. And like I mentioned right before the episode started, there are so many experts that have come to this show. So it's a complete honor to be on this Marketing Hero podcast, and you have to bring your A-game here. So thanks again for having me.

Maia Wells:

Well, thanks for being here. We really do appreciate your perspective because it's a unique one. So we're going to get into that in a couple of minutes here, but I want to start off with a question that I like to ask every single guest, what's your favorite part of your career and how did you figure that out?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Yeah. The favorite part of my career is everything that I do with SEO, everything that I do with growth, user acquisition, to be able to make a direct and tangible impact on the business by making smart SEO investments, and by simply expanding the visibility of your products via organic channels. To me, that is something that has resonated with me right from the beginning. Just that business impact that you can make, because at the end of the day, ideas are plenty. Ideas are free, but engineering is not. So to be able to prioritize the right kind of initiatives, that rewarding sort of dopamine hit of helping a business grow, that they were able to accomplish something amazing because of something that you were able to help them with. That is something that continues to resonate with me from day one when I joined my first company find the best and even today here at Course Hero.

Maia Wells:

So talk to me a little bit more about that dopamine hit, because I feel the same thing. I'm in marketing as well, and seeing the reporting especially is exciting for me because I can visually see that I'm helping businesses to grow. Tell me a little bit more about that or is there a particular dopamine hit that you can remember on a story of success that you could share with us to kind of kick us off here?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Yeah. One of the first things that I did when I joined Course Hero was to do an SEO audit for them. Again, I joined as an engineer, I have that engineering background. I was an engineering manager... but that SEO experience that I had gained from my previous work experience that I kind of brought it to Course Hero. And the very first thing, like I said, was "Complete an SEO audit," and that SEO audit took about a month. I came up with like 50 different recommendations for the company, prioritized like highest priority, medium, low. And the company ended up actually implementing all 50 of those in the next three months.

Maia Wells:

Wow.

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

And as a result of that, we saw our growth rate go from about 30% year over year to close to 200% year over year. And again, not a small denominator to begin with, we were getting, we were fairly successful even at that time. So that is where that real passion to continue focusing on SEO, despite my engineering background and the role that I was hired for really grew for me. And then over time as the business grew and the opportunity here became more evident and larger, we just made the shift and build this SEO team.

Maia Wells:

That sounds really exciting. So it was kind of this shift in your career. Before we go into a little bit more detail about that, can you just back up and tell us briefly what is Course Hero? Just kind of want to give a context for what we're speaking about today.

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Of course, so Course Hero is a connected learning platform. It was founded in 2006 and today has more than 60 million core specific study resources. And these are created by students for students and educators use our platform as well. Students from all over the world use a platform to get access to... For specific notes, study guides, understand their homework, practice their exams, and educators use our platform to find teaching resources, they want to curate their classroom instruction and to connect with other teachers.

So our content is notably inclusive of a lot of these documents, notes, practice tests, tutor supported Q&A, and textbook solutions, and it's an ever growing library. Because of our business model, we are getting content from users at the rate of nodes. Like every a year, we get tens of millions of new unique pieces of content that is industry specific, education specific that really continues to expand our organic reach.

And what we have learned over this period is, hey, if you're building these amazing products, the best products, these documents, these nodes, these Q&A, and these study guides might as well take the time to make it discoverable by Google because there's no point building all of these amazing products if they're not going to be used by users. And one of the best channels to acquire users is SUN and via Google.

And for us, that understanding of the potential of our content has resulted in 80 to 90% of our traffic being driven by organic channels. And that's like crazy to think about in terms of the scale. We even from that 80, 90%, most of that is coming from Google and thanks to our continuous growth over the last few years and the four new awesome acquisitions in the last 12 months, this year, we are on track to hit a billion visits, a billion organic visits. And that is only possible if you have built a culture of SEO.

Maia Wells:

That's an unbelievable number. I think for most of the people that listen to our show, they're trying to reach thousands of visits per month, or even a 100,000 visits in a month as they're first starting up. So I definitely want to get into talking about the scale of that as we continue the interview, but you just mentioned something that I don't want to skip over, because it's just such an interesting phrase. You said that you have built a culture of SEO. What does that mean? Can you tell us what that means either in the context of Course Hero itself or just in general, how do you build a culture of SEO?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

It starts by evangelizing the enormous potential of SEO, like folks in the company, your product owners, your marketing team, your analytics team, they need to understand what are all the different opportunities to scale the product and how SEO can be such a big opportunity in terms of really expanding the visibility of the product. So highlighting that the relatively low cost of doing SEO, because unlike paid marketing or most other acquisition channels, it's relatively cheaper. It's most of your investment is on the people on the SEO team and maybe a few tools that you use. So showing the potential, demonstrating that it's relatively low cost, and then most importantly, demonstrating early wins.

To build that culture, you cannot do that without actually showing some wins early on. So once you can accomplish all of this with reasonable success, then you start building a roadmap around SEO. You kind of also need to identify the team that you need to hire, and you need to hire the right talent as well. We today have a team of 15 plus dedicated to just SEO. And this is not the only team that works on SEO, there are other product teams, other folks around the company that are working on SEO, but we have a team of 15 that is like just focused on SEO, the infrastructure, the AV testing platform, the keyword tracking, the integration with tools, your own pages, your element site maps, you name it.

So that's, that's the next logical step. And once you've made some headway there, then it is about influencing other product owners to incorporate SEO into their roadmap and to demonstrate how smart SEO investments can help their products be successful. For instance, now SEO is the very first thing that we talk about when it comes to roadmap learning across the company, and you cannot achieve this by demonstrating those wins, demonstrating the impact of SEO, having that ability to measure the impact and stuff.

So these are all like the key ways that you can start building that SEO culture within the company, besides these, there are a number of simple ways, small things that you can do or change with respect to the process that can continue to strengthen that SEO culture that you're building. Like you can make sure just like code review and QA SEO review is like part of your product development life cycle.

You can also make sure that when you're hiring new folks onto the team within the company, no matter which team they're hired for that they are going through an onboarding process, not just for the product and in the team that they're supporting, but also on SEO, especially if SEO is driving a lot of your traffic and revenue.

And then lastly, by continuously sharing these SEO wins and learnings with the rest of the organization, with the company, with the product team, with analytics, with marketing, with engineering, especially, because engineering can play a meaningful role here because on page technical is something that is not very difficult and it's relatively easy, but to do it right, is hard. And engineering can sometimes have a lot of interesting ideas of how to make some of those on page technical changes happen. So getting their buy-in is something that we strive for as well, and has helped us. Some of our best ideas have come from engineering team.

So that's just getting the team excited about what we do and benefiting from all of their thoughts, insights, and that culture that you would build around SEO.

Maia Wells:

And so for people like me, who work on the content side and do content marketing all the time, we kind of get it that SEO is important. It's important for what you call things in a product. It's important to think about how people actually search for that solution. So I feel like half the audience that we're speaking to will get it and get why this is such an important connection and maybe the other half won't.

And I'm wondering, what does it actually look like when you're not building a culture of SEO? Maybe there's an example from your career you can think about before this, that maybe it wasn't done in this way, where we're bringing together so many different aspects of a company to at least understand the importance of SEO. Can you think of an example where it doesn't go well? Where maybe product development is working in a silo away from marketing.

And I can think of an example where we may be using the wrong terminology, even to describe what a product actually does in terms of gaining organic traffic for that. Because people don't really know that term, for example, maybe it's jargon, or maybe it's your proprietary term, the way that you talk about a certain solution. I'm just kind of thinking in my mind of this is a really cool ideal, right? Like bringing together engineering and everyone in the company to understand SEO and build together towards organic traffic. But what does it look like when we're not doing that?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Yeah. And when I said that we have built a culture around SEO, it's still not perfect. There are several instances even today where what you just shared happens, where a certain new product owner or a new team that we are building, or someone new hired onto the team, they may not fully understand the impact on SEO, the issues that might come up when working on different product initiatives.

So one such example that again, that happens from time to time for us, because we are so driven by user generated content, our focus on... From an SEO perspective, there are a couple of things. One is the amount of content and then the quality of content. And let's say the product owner is focused, is goaled around like how much content we are able to acquire or create. And it's independent of the quality and how much traffic is driving how many conversions in that.

What that can lead to is you having a negative impact on your crawl budget. Your indexation might go down. The pages that are getting indexed might not be driving enough organic impressions and, and Google can react to it. Like it can see that, hey, I'm sending traffic to this site, but it's not... There's a high bounce rate. Folks are not spending enough time on the site. So it happened multiple times where we had to make sure that while content acquisition and quantity of content is important, we need to make sure that we are also focusing on the quality of the content. And we have built an entire system around this, where we have manual checks.

In some instances we would have ML participating to understand the structure of the content, to understand the formatting of the content, what is identified as valuable versus not. So this is one example where that culture, despite being built in the company was lacking in one instance where we then again, had to demonstrate how the focus being just on quantity can have a negative impact on the rest of the goals for the company. And it's not something that's useful only from a SEO perspective, even for users, if you are publishing a ton of content that's lacking demand, that's going to negatively impact your user experience and the trust that you're building with your users as well. So that's one example I can share here.

Maia Wells:

And that's a great example. So for those of you out there who are demanding that your content team produces one blog per week, no matter what, think about that, because quantity is not necessarily the only goal according to Abishek here. So definitely an important point. Now you mentioned really amazing results. I mean, you're talking about billions of visits here and building this company-wide culture of SEO, you've skyrocketed organic traffic. I mean, we're talking millions of monthly visits, and I think you mentioned, you've gotten even like 150% year over year gains with what you're doing, right?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Yeah, we have seen success in the early years, and larger success in the early years as you're continuously lapping that incremental success... not like 150 or 200%, but still meaningful wins across the board.

Maia Wells:

Mm-hmm, definitely. Well, so you've mentioned a couple of points of what you did to get there and how you're continuing to see this type of growth year after year. And it included some stuff I'd really like to dive into, because I don't know enough about this, and I think some of our listeners would benefit, too. So there's a couple bullet points that I want to talk about.

One of them is you mentioned when we were preparing for this interview about cleaning up technical debt. So I want to talk about that. I want to talk about optimizing on page SEO. You said engineering can actually really have great ideas when it comes to that. So let's talk about that a little bit more. And then there were some other techniques like internal and external link building, integrating SEO deep into all product decisions. Now that's a really great topic that we will dive into in a minute here.

You've experienced and explored various advanced SEO tactics. So we want to get the juice from you on that. And then definitely the idea of working closely with engineering and product and design, and, just everybody else, analytics teams, because we oftentimes see SEO almost as an afterthought, or just somebody out over there that works in a cubicle we don't talk too much, or even an outside contractor that doesn't even work inside the company.

So I want to go through some of these efforts individually, just because I think these are all just, these six different ways that you're working have had a huge impact on your organic traffic growth. So let's start a little bit, let's get into it right away. Let's start with technical debt. What does it mean to clean up technical debt? Because remember most of us are marketers, so speak to us like we're five, because most of us act like we are, but tell it to us like we're five years old, we're marketers, what is technical debt and how do you clean it up? And what does that have to do with SEO?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Absolutely. So technical debt here refers to SEO technical debt, when I'm talking about technical debt on the SEO side of things. So it's anytime you let's say run a crawl analysis, using a tool like [inaudible 00:17:13] or Deepcrawl or Screaming Frog, they constantly find several small issues. Your on page elements might be off, your titles, your meta descriptions, your linking. You might have other small crawl issues resulting in redirect or, of course, you might identify structure data issues and whatnot, right?

So I encourage marketers to have a running backlog of such tickets for the team by reviewing the technical health of your SEO on a monthly basis. And during this exercise, we need to also constantly think about the user. If you are only focused on identifying SEO issues, you might propose a solution that might help from an SEO perspective, but might have a negative impact on SEO.

So always think about the user. At the end of the day, you are designing your product for the user, not necessarily for the bots. We just need to find the right balance between the two, because for me, successful EOS is not about tricking Google, but to partner with their search engine, to provide the best experience, the best search results for its users.

So once, once you have a backlog of issues and you have vetted it, at Course Hero, what we do is we organize what we call SEOthons, and this is organized on a quarterly basis. We run it for two weeks, the entire team of engineers, product, and analytics within the SEO team. We are part of it. And during this period, this team is focused on scratching bugs, all kinds of SEO bugs, cleaning up technical debt. And we also kind of make it fun by gamifying it, by making it kind of a competition for our developers. We even include some prizes. We follow it with the fun team activity and that adds cherry to the cake. So it's one of many ways you can go about tackling technical debt.

You can also try to make it part of your sprint planning process, where every single sprint, you have a bunch of issues or SEO tech debt initiatives that are in the backlog. So that folks, engineers, when they have some downtime, they can pick it up and clean it up. Because these tech debt kind of initiatives, they're never going to be prioritized. That's not the highest priority for the product. That's not going to have the biggest impact, but just having that running backlog and continuously working on it and making sure that most of the pages are compliant, it goes a long, long way.

Maia Wells:

Okay. I have a side question on that because I feel like I talk a lot about technical debt without calling it technical debt. And so I'm wondering... This is a personal question for you to answer for me. I'm just going to use my power as the podcast host to ask this... So kind of coming from the content side, a lot of times what we'll run into, especially with companies that have been around for a while, who've been writing content for a while, releasing different types of products or services, there sometimes ends up being repetitive content on the site. Let's say you have five different blog posts about a particular solution or something like that. Does that affect this pile of technical debt or is that not really technical debt?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

It's duplicate content is what you are referring to. I don't necessarily see that as technical debt. That's a content related issue. For me, technical debt is when you have broken pages, broken links, unintentional no follows, or no index, incorrect canonical tags, URL issues, page title issues, some quick wins that you can get by making page performance, whether there'd be improvements, or you have some mobile web related issues.

I think those quick hits is what I was referring to as technical debt that we like to take care of on a constant basis, if there is an issue with content at scale that needs to be investigated and worked on, maybe working with, let's say the ML team in some cases, in other cases, just the engineering team. I think that anything that's a bit more involved and can take multiple sprints or weeks, I think that we try to tackle those in a slightly different way, by making sure that it's prioritized in the roadmap.

Maia Wells:

Makes sense. Thank you for clarifying that. So, Abishek, what does it actually mean to integrate SEO into product decisions? I think that's a really new concept for us here at the Marketing Hero. What does it mean to even do that? Can you tell us more about how product and SEO work together at Course Hero or any other place that you want to bring up?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Yeah. So integrating SEO into product decision means that SEO is a function or a feature of the product. It means that product is designed with SEO input from the beginning, as opposed to layering it on top of it near the very end when you're launching the product. So it's less about optimizing something after it's made and more optimizing something before it's made. So it is important that you work very closely with your different product stakeholders during their planning phase and brainstorm opportunities to drive impact and identify gaps and opportunities for the product when it comes to their organic potential.

Sometimes it could mean working on internal linking or recommendations to help Google discover the product that you're building. Because, hey, as a product owner, you are going to be really proud of what you're building, but again, it's only as useful as the number of users who are seeing it and using it and converting on it. So make sure that that product is discoverable by users and especially Google as well.

And other times it could be ensuring that the pages are mobile friendly or performing from a page speed perspective. So again, all of these should help the user as well. None of this is only being done to optimize for SEO and for bots, because the trick to doing SEO well is to always think about the user. And something that really helps when having these conversations is to have an accurate tracking of your TSU funnel metrics. Just like you have user journeys, you have conversion funnels, there's also an SEO funnel that the team needs to understand and be aware of. Think of any page, like you're either creating a blog content or launching a new page type, any page that's added to the platform, it needs go through various stages of the SEO funnel before it can even start driving traffic.

And that is the SEO funnel that I generally talk about with my team, with the product stakeholders. Firstly, it needs to be discovered by bots. It then needs to be crawled and that's like measured by your crawl coverage of your site. And for... You can influence crawl by adding site maps. You can have internal linking recommendations, et cetera. So once content is crawled, the bots then may choose to index it or not. And whether it's indexed or not is determined by your content quality, the page speed, whether the page is mobile friendly, how unique is the content that you are adding. There are all of these factors that determine whether your page gets indexed or not, and that's measured by your index session rate.

And then once it's indexed, the page then needs to be ranking for relevant queries, which is your impressions, which is your rankings. So that's the next part of the funnel. And finally it gets clicked on hopefully by the user, which is your visits, which is your sessions, and a number of different factors that contribute to this, which is like how does your [inaudible 00:24:15] look like how, how does your result look like on the [inaudible 00:24:19]? What does your title look like? Is it clean, you made a description? Do you have a rating schema, if applicable? Any other structure data, are you showing up on question zero, where applicable? What does your URL look like?

So all of these then influence your clickthrough rate and then hence influences your ability to get traffic, organic traffic. And once the user has landed on your page, then the sign up conversion funnel takes over. So it's very important that you make the product owners aware of this and help them visualize these, all of these steps that your content needs to go through before it can even start generating traffic and conversions and signups and everything, and how promoting content by organic search can have a massive positive impact on the success of their product. SEO is here to design and is designed to help promoting your content because SEO isn't about content creation. It's about content promotion.

Maia Wells:

That's a really poignant quote. I think I'm going to print that out and put it on my office wall, definitely. So does that mean that having these conversations early on with the product team as things are being built, does that mean that SEO concerns end up influencing the product itself? Meaning what features might be highlighted more or what they might be called?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

I prefer not to influence the product owners to that extent where they're designing the product for SEO. They still need to design it for the user. You have to do your user research. You have to make sure you're vetting your designs and you're optimizing for user experience. All I'm asking here from product owners is to see how by making sure that you're taking care of all of the SEO fundamentals, best practices, enabling your content to be discoverable and indexable by Google.

And you can do this without having any negative impact on your user experience. And in most cases, your SEO changes and user experience related changes go hand in hand. There'll be some odd instances where they might conflict each other, and that you need to make a judgment call. You might need to run an AP test to figure out what's the right trade off. But in most instances, you design the product for the user and you want to make sure that the health of that product from an SEO perspective is also measured throughout that product journey.

Maia Wells:

Thanks for clarifying that. One thing that's sticking out to me so much in this interview is just literally the scale at which you're working. Like I was mentioning earlier on, many of us, especially working at SaaS startups or in smaller companies, small to medium size businesses, getting to a million hits in a month is quite a big deal. So tell us a little bit more about maybe the unique challenges you're facing or the unique wins that you're having when dealing with millions and millions of monthly visits versus thousands. What's it like to run SEO at such a large scale?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

It's an honor, but it's also a challenge, and it's a challenge where if done well, it can be very rewarding and fulfilling. So when working on SEO at scale, you can no longer just think about simple SEO elements, just your page title and meta descriptions and meta tags and stuff. You have to think about SEO holistically. When dealing with this scale, you need to think about crawl budgets. You need to think about content quality, hidden duplicate content, site architecture, your internal linking, page performance, whether your content is mobile friendly.

How about core vitals are you doing well from that perspective? You have to look at all kinds of traffic, traffic from the region that you're optimizing for, but also traffic from regions that you're not optimizing for from a conversion perspective, international traffic, for instance.

So keep being a close eye on all of these metrics, and also then you have to keep a close eye on on what's happening on Google's end and with your competition. So it's an interesting space. It's what keeps me going. I'm very passionate about the ability to continue to scale when you have this volume of content to optimize for. You cannot optimize any of this at one URL or page level, you have to do it at the cohort level, the page type level. So it's, like I said, it's very challenging. It's very rewarding, especially when you can like see the impact and the wins. So for me, it's not about getting more traffic, right? You can get more traffic in a number of different ways and not all of that traffic can be valuable to you. It's, again, not about getting more traffic it's about getting targeted relevant traffic.

Maia Wells:

I hear you on that a hundred percent. So how do you measure the impact of that? How do you measure SEO impact overall? How do you measure the impact of getting that targeted, relevant traffic?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Yeah, I truly believe in what gets measured gets improved. So one of the things that I recommend any SEO to do, especially when they're managing a large site and have either tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands or more pages is to invest in an SEO AB testing platform. Oftentimes this could mean building your own because there might be some limitations of any of the shelf platforms that might be available. So this is one of the first things that we worked on, once we build the SEO team, this allows us to measure the impact of every single change that we are making from an on page perspective, technical perspective. We can understand what's the impact on traffic. What's the impact on crawl rate, indexation, ranking, how user experiences be impacted with the changes that we are making with respect to bounce rates, time on site, and even conversion signups.

You can measure all of these for any SEO changes that you're making. And what this helps is build confidence on your hypothesis, on what the priorities should be for your roadmaps, and so this also helps us scale our tests confidently. Otherwise, if you don't know if something worked or not, and you're kind of relying on like a pre-post analysis, there are so many other factors at play. Like an algorithm change might have happened while you were running some experiment, or your competition might have done something. There might be seasonality that can have an impact on how you are seeing the impact of a change.

So this helps us scale our tests confidently and then to apply these changes, these learnings, to other areas of the organization, through other products. This also helps us in road mapping and evangelizing SEO across the company. Because if you are able to demonstrate impact and you can demonstrate wins, it's easier for other folks around the company to then get that executive buy in to then prioritize SEO onto their roadmap. Otherwise, we are always like questioning, "Hey, what's the impact of this SEO change? Why should we work on SEO? Is this more impactful than something else that we might be doing for conversions or acquisitions?"

So just having that ability, that tool to measure the impact was a really long [inaudible 00:31:19]. And let the test speak for itself, because we might sometimes be biased with the certain SEO change that you're making. You said, "Okay, yeah, this one's definitely going to work." And if you are not testing it, you may never be able to actually know whether it worked or not. Because a certain best practice might work for some other site, but for your industry, for your domain, for your product, it might not work. So this, SEO AB testing platform really goes a long way in understanding the impact of your changes, communicating that impact, and then using that to then scale your future initiatives.

Maia Wells:

And so if I'm hearing you correctly, you built that for yourselves at Course Hero to be able to do that, right?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Right. We looked at multiple different tools. We evaluated them. Unfortunately, we were not able to find anything that met our needs. So we spent about three months, an entire quarter to build that tool for ourselves. And since then, every single year, we run dozens of SEO tests and to begin with it was being used by just my team on the SEO side of things. Now the entire organization on the product side is using this platform.

Maia Wells:

Wow. So maybe you can even launch that as a side product someday, because I know there's a lot of us out there that are hanging onto your every word and thinking about, "Wow, how can I apply some of this to my business that I'm growing?" That's really, really useful to think about it in that way. Well, can you tell us, Abishek, what is next for you either within Course Hero or in life in general? What are you most excited about, that's coming up soon for you?

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Within Course Hero, like I alluded to earlier, we have recently acquired four different companies and each of them are strong from an SEO perspective, but they bring this unique value proposition and an opportunity for us to scale from an SEO perspective. So I'm really looking forward to figuring out a way to integrate those products with Course Hero and how this strong SEO team that we have built within the company can help each of these subsidiaries be successful.

So that's something that I'm looking forward to. I'm also looking forward to where this SEO industry is headed. It's crazy, it's volatile, it's ever changing. And I would like to say it's changing for the better, for the most part. There might be maybe a change here or there from Google's perspective, that might not be something that you completely agree with. But otherwise I would say 95% of the changes that Google's making on their end is beneficial to sites. So looking forward to that as well.

So it's something that I like to continue to also give back to the community. There are a lot of folks, especially again, listeners of this podcast that hopefully will benefit from some of these learnings. And I'm happy to continue to help them even outside of this podcast, if they want to connect with me on LinkedIn.

Maia Wells:

Well, there you heard it. Everybody you can connect on LinkedIn. We are definitely so grateful for Abishek Surana Rajendra coming on our podcast today from Course Hero to talk about the intersection of engineering and SEO.

So I feel like none of us are going to leave that connection behind again, after this conversation. It is just such a fascinating crossroads that we should all be paying attention to in SaaS marketing.

So thank you, Abishek. We really appreciate you coming on the show today.

Abishek Surana Rajendra:

Thank you again. Thank you so much for having me. Cheers.

Want to Reach Abishek?

https://www.linkedin.com/in/abishek-surana-rajendra/ 

 

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